For quite a while now, I’ve been considering having some guest posts on the blog to help liven up the conversation and add some new perspectives. I was contacted by Elijah recently and after reading other examples of his work on The Iterative, I thought it would be great to give this aspiring student a chance to share his voice. I’m pleased to present the first in what I hope to be a new collaborative approach to sharing insights on technology trends and advances in the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry. Please, give us your feedback. We’d love to hear from you. – Sean

Elijah Gregory is a high school senior who’s interest in architecture software and BIM has lead to him becoming a fount of knowledge in this evolving field.

I recently had the opportunity to attend an industry review on a relatively new Trimble product, Vico. Vico is a VDC, or Virtual Design and Construction, software which bridges the gap between the BIM guys and decision makers in a company. In the two-day introduction to the product and the product’s capabilities, a common construction cycle became clear to me: receive concept of a proposed structure, design, estimate, schedule, and deliver.

A Brief History

Initially, BIM and VDC originated from CAD software. The original goal of CAD was to increase productivity and accuracy hand-drawing lacked. From there, simple 3D models arose to display a more comprehensible visual to both designers and clients. And following simple 3D models, BIM was created to derive information from drawings and models. Finally, VDC has been created to leverage the information created by BIM software to make accurate estimates and schedules as well as do statistical analysis on various aspects of the structure.

Advantage?

VDC essentially takes a project from the design to delivery checkpoints in the construction cycle and by doing so, quickly breaks down projects so decisions can be made quickly and appropriately. The VDC cycle follows the same steps as the construction cycle by reaping the information produced by BIM software, provided BIM managers follow best practices during design–a key issue not so uniformly answered, but that’s for another article. Provided best practices have been used, when a model is loaded into VDC software–Navisworks or Vico or whatever your preference may be–a tremendous bank of values should be at the tips of your fingers and the click of a mouse. Who said being a computer nerd wasn’t cool?

VDC in Practice

Today, the amount of information which can be leveraged from this initial model is up to three variables: the quality of the model, the level of skill of the VDC software user, and the desired amount of information to be leveraged. From the initial design, material and quantity takeoffs are created, which can be used with known labor rates, overhead, and profit to generate an estimate. From the estimate, budgets are established. On the same work plane level as estimating and in collaboration with the model, schedules are created, which can be projected from inception to delivery of the structure. These three parts allow the decision makers of a company to look at accurate information graphically, via modeling, and by hard numbers which act as a facilitator to the most important element in construction: decision making. But wait–there’s more: The VDC cycle takes the construction cycle a step further by integrating actual values produced into future projects for an incredibly accurate projection of costs and scheduling. In other words, the company can analyze decisions made in the past to add curves in the road to making decisions in the future. BIM-ception? Diving into the current BIM and VDC software lineup from front-runners offer a promising glimpse into the future: collaboration with all stakeholders from inception to delivery.

Elijah can be found on Twitter – @ElijahGregory97

~ More of his recent writing can be found here:

One comment on “The VDC Cycle: Leveraging the “I” in BIM

Leave a Reply